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TRA ROMA E IL MARE


Book


While traveling through the flat expanse stretching over Rome’s southwestern area, along a stretch of the river Tiber enclosed between the Portuense and Ostiense roads, we come across some substantial segments of the directional and logistical system of the capital city. This almost entirely linear trajectory, interspersed with large green areas and with some aggressive, almost ravenous urban developments, seem to paint one of the most incisive pictures of the city. It is a peripheral area void of any developmental logic, erected by complying with economic or political interests, favoring large landowners and the aims of influential private investors. In this territory, all building developments seem to escape any governmental overseeing and thus become self-referential monads that further destabilize the existing unstable balances. Many buildings or complexes of buildings act as specialized citadels. Some of which – such as the “Leonardo da Vinci” intercontinental airport, the Interporto, the Muratella office park, the Fiera di Roma and the Alitalia Headquarters – are of international relevance. They are connected to large infrastructures, such as the Grande Raccordo Anulare (Rome’s main ring road), as well as highways, railways and the river Tiber. A large-scale urban project focused on the landscape’s values might help sewing back all the peripheral patches of this area together, as this book is going to show.





Lina Malfona, Tra Roma e il mare (Between Rome and the Sea), forward by Piero Ostilio Rossi. Melfi: Edizioni Libria, 2014.



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